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to jennifer. jennifer is an accounting supervisor in our finance accounting division and has been with the agency for five years. she is being recognized today for her outstanding performance in completing the analysis of the m.t.a.'s 20 bank accounts with the bank of america. she was able to determine if banking services were needed in her review and the closeout of unnecessary accounts. she consolidated accounts resulting in the reduction of our bankees. in addition, as part of the proposition 8 mandated chart of accounts and budget restructuring project, jennifer worked tirelessly in detailed analysis of several special revenue funds that were repeeled with many challenges, she was able to successfully complete this project timely and close out the fund balances of these accounts. our director of finance is here to present the award to jennifer. >> thank you, mr. ford. good afternoon, everybody. i'm honored to be here to present this award to jennifer. jennifer is a new mom. and so she's very busy with that effort. but she also was given a chance to move ton another department
jennifer johnson. you can continue the conversation off line. >> my name is jennifer johnson, i am a deputy public defender. i represent 100 seriously mentally ill clients in our behavior and held court. i have been part of the program since the planning stages. i have seen the evolution of the program. most of mcclintock felony charges and a freezing state prison. about 75 -- most of my clients have felony charges and are facing state prison. all of my clients are in behavioral health court and in the criminal justice system because of an treated mental illness. if they had been treated, have access to proper treatment in the community, they would not be in the jail. is that simple. -- it is that simple. this is not a problem that is going to get better. it is a problem that is likely to get worse. the state prison system is overcrowded. it is releasing people back to the streets. there has been a change in the law. people in state prisoner serving less time. there are a huge number of people in state prison who have a major mental illness. they will be on our streets. this problem is seri
to touch on base with what was said, especially some of the things that jennifer johnson said, who is my attorney. some of the things that were sitting here tonight are some of the things that i have received. the money threatening to be cut because of the money or whatever. nearby had not had access, -- if i had not had access, i would not be standing here today. i was diagnosed as a schizophrenic, and with long- term treatment, i was able to make some drastic changes in my life. i am able to obtain and hold a job at this point. there have been times where i did not have a clue where to get treatment at because i did not know where it was available, and that is what is happening now. people do not know where to get it. if it had not been for the health corp., i would truly be shepherded into the system -- if it had not been for the health court. those places and things are needed, desperately, because if i had not been able to go to one to deal with both my addictions, the mental health and my drug addiction, that i do not know where i would be. i would probably be in prison somewhere.
am jennifer low. today we are focusing on district 7. the district between the lake and zoo. to remain something of a mystery of san francisco. let's find the charm of district 7. >> look at this, it's one of the most unique strips in all of san francisco. we have the unique neighborhoods to make san francisco what it is. they are unique and distinct and have their own characteristics. that's what we love. >> i think the most characteristic in district 7 you have residents that have been here forever. you have generations. i am fourth generation san franciscoian. you have a lot of people that live in san francisco that live in the sunny side and lived out here for years. as a result you have a real concern and care for just basic quality of life and community issues. i think that's our unique characteristic. >> strict 7 has reputation of being the conservative district. let's hear from the locals. >> i would say it looks to city government to provide more basic city services. it's a focus on the basics. and if that's more conservative, so be it. >> frequent midwest
, jennifer salerno, meridian management group, against the department of public works, involving it a tree -- involving a tree. commissioner hwang: we always start with the department. ms. short? >> good evening. carla short. we approved three. tonight's concern is about the denial of the four remaining trees. two of these are one species, and two are another kind. that is a red flower when regionflo -- that is a red flowering gum. this will still allow the repair of the sidewalk, four feet for the pubs of trouble. so the decision was recommended that the property owner could contact us when they begin to undertake these sidewalk repairs, and the bad points in time, based on the route structure, we did not believe that we would grant an emergency removal permits, so we have wa to the condition of the trees, and it is based on the condition of the trees and, of course, public safety. if we think it can be repaired, we will deny the removal of the trees and recommend moving forward with that. there is a little discretion if we did the feel of that time that they were more significant than we
. i'm jennifer lowe. today we will focus on district five. let's get started by looking at the problems the residents are facing. >> any of the problems we speak of in district five i think we're speaking of about the city overall. when i -- i shall share with you whether it's a question of housing, affordable housing, public safety, making sure that violent crime and homicides that have plagued san francisco for two years, unprecedented which we haven't seen in 12 years, i believe, the kind of people displacement of, as i said working class and african-americans, speaks to a trend that i think, overall, we should be concerned about in san francisco, so that this city, 10 years, 20 years from now, is not one that is delineated into two san franciscos, where the have and have notes. >> we are still in the midst of having to fight every single day for our portion of jobs, for the city, for our portions of appropriate housing for our community, and our share of whatever activities that can move a community forward. so that's like a constant fight. if you go out to for insta
an until next time i am jennifer love and nairchg thanks for wat. >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >>
will survive and thrive. for sfg tv i'm jennifer low and as always, thanks for watching.
in 2009. that is a lot of contact that should not be occurring at all. jennifer will be talking about the behavioral health court. as an aside to that, for people who are mentally ill and participating in the behavioral health corporation, they already have to wait between four and eight weeks for community placement. they're just sitting in jail waiting for a place to go. they're waiting for treatment. the cuts in community programs are starting to make this worse. that is all that i had to say. >> do we have any questions? yes, mr. martin. >> you are getting the overflow? >> we treat people who come into the jail and are referred for mental health care. >> the doctor described the bottleneck at san francisco general. i take it you are getting a much increased flow of people into the jail? >> yes. >>
are not removed, they have to be seriously trimmed but -- back, because as jennifer has mentioned, when facing dolores park, there are steps leading in and out of dolores park, and it does present a safety hazard. so, basically, what i am saying is i would like you to seriously consider the request to remove these trees and put some trees that are more consistent with what is there unlike the city installed, given the fact that the owner is willing to absorb 100% of the cost of this. i do not think it is an unreasonable request. commissioner fung: do you know what kind of trees were installed by the city? >> uh, i'm not sure. they are like little maple trees. they installed them all of the way up church street. commissioner fung: what size are they? >> well, they are fairly small now, but i expect -- 8 feet, maybe 9 feet, 10 feet. these trees and we're talking about today or maybe 30 feet high. they have become a real problem, and not just from the words with the sidewalks buckling, but also the fact that it is creating a problem in terms of the foliage. commissioner hwang: in terms of the fol
out to drdr. quanbeck, jennifer friedenbach, thomas jefferson, annette robinson, pam fisher, fred martin, dr. jones, susan mcintyre, virginia wright, tom purvixs, officer dunn. i like to thank you all for participating in this very special hearing. i would like to make sure that the things said this evening reached the ears of those in office at this moment. those who control the purse strings, those who make the decisions to make these cuts. we let you hear from firsthand responders, from those who are on the ground, from those professionals who have experience dealing with those in crisis. we've heard from the public this evening, passionate testimony regarding help services help out and why we need to continue with services. with that, i would like to thank you all for coming. again, we have openings on the mental health board. i hope you will grab some of our fliers and get in touch with our staff to explore the possibility of being able to sit here and make changes have been -- happen. the mental health board has done fantastic things like bringing the mental health services
and that mid-market is not the dividing line between north and south. jennifer low: welcome back to district sf on sfgtv. this month we're at the asian art museum in the center of san francisco and the center of district 6. it's a wide area in the city, one that many people just drive through, with locked doors. but when we go inside mid-market, the tenderloin, and south of market, you'll see the reality is different from the reputation. we met district 6's supervisor, chris daly, while he was visiting residents of an sro hotel now managed by the city. the success at the mission hotel is one example, of halting decades of decline, in the very heart of san francisco. the story of what is now district 6, is just the most current chapter of center city's long history. charles fracchia: districts began in the gold rush and were pretty much a part of all the 19th century. with a few exceptions, you've cobbled together e bunch of neighborhoods, and so districts are largely pretty much disparate areas. they take in a whole variety of different kinds of neighborhoods. in district 6, you've got part of
'm jennifer lowe for sfg tv. thanks for watching. . >> my name is mark tieman and i'm senior councilor at pet camp, san francisco, california. we dispose of a lot of carbon-based material here, dog poop, and the more we can turn that into something viable, the better off we are. in san francisco there's more dogs than children. finding a viable use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and that's a way to win hearts and minds. [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. richie! yo, tye! what-up? richie! what-up, player? how ya doing, son? all right, man. i'm chillin', of course. click freedomcenter.org to find yours.
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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